Intended Audience:

Preschool—Adult: Administrators, Classroom Teachers, Special Ed Teachers, Staff Developers, Parents

Duration:

Session may be Keynote Address or Workshop Session. Session time is flexible

Short Abstract:

Dyslexia is now recognized as the nation’s number one learning disability. One in five children may have dyslexia causing them to struggle with reading and spelling. Every teacher likely has at least one or two dyslexic children in his or her classroom today. This 2018 up-to-date session helps participants understand, identify, and overcome reading and spelling problems associated with dyslexia.

 

Content:

  • Organization of the Reading Brain
  • Answers to Frequently Asked Questions
  • Common Misconceptions
  • How to better accommodate dyslexics in the regular classroom (dyslexia-specific interventions)

 

Dr. Gentry is a dyslexia advocate who has overcome dyslexia himself. His work in this area includes parent and teacher workshops for the Toronto District School Board (the seventh largest district in North America) and keynoting the Dallas Branch of the International  Dyslexia Association Conference—one of the largest in the nation. Optional workshop resources include his book chapters on dyslexia and publications on dyslexia in Psychology Today:

 

“7 Ways to Accommodate Dyslexics in Regular Classrooms: Find out easy ways to help dyslexics in the regular classroom.”

 

PROBLEM:

Dyslexics are known to have difficulty with expressive language. For example, they may have trouble retrieving the right words to express themselves (even though the word is on the tip of their tongue) or difficulty organizing their thoughts in conversation.

 

SOLUTIONdyslexia specific intervention:

A teacher who understands the child’s situation will be patient and understanding and perhaps look for other ways of expression or alternatives for demonstrating competence.

 

PROBLEM:

Difficulty organizing, managing their time, and following a teacher’s directions. Additionally, some studies have shown that dyslexics can have difficulty filtering out background noise (Lapkin, 2016).

 

SOLUTION—dyslexia specific intervention:

Cutting back on classroom noise, reducing distractions, or seat placement closer to the teacher to help the student focus on instruction can be helpful (Sperling, Lu, Manis, & Seidenberg, 2005). Also, recognize that boys with dyslexia sometimes act out due to frustration.

 

PROBLEM:

Dyslexics often have difficulty with handwriting.

 

SOLUTIONdyslexia specific intervention:

Be an advocate for teaching handwriting in school.

 

With beginners:

  • handwriting experience facilitates letter learning
  • sets up the neural systems that underlie reading, writing, and spelling
  • it predicts later reading success
  • dyslexic-specific intervention that should be happening in all schools.

 

NOTE: Dyslexics tend to spell better in cursive. Even in upper elementary and middle school, research has shown that learning to write in cursive improved spelling and composing skills (Berninger, 2015).

 

PROBLEM:

Spelling is the telltale sign of dyslexia.

 

SOLUTIONdyslexia specific intervention:

Use a research-based spelling curriculum as a dyslexic-specific intervention.

 

  • a research-based, grade-by-grade spelling curriculum
  • explicit spelling instruction 15 minutes a day
  • monitor students’ progress. In kindergarten and Grade 1 monitoring children’s invented spelling (i.e., children’s self-directed attempts to spell words) in five developmental phases
  • recognizing signals of dyslexia in elementary students writing

 

PROBLEM: Dyslexics likely can’t “see” words in their mind when they spell.

 

SOLUTIONdyslexia specific intervention:

Expect to give dyslexics more help with proofreading.

  • avoid criticizing or counting off for spelling errors
  • offer extra support and teach them spelling consciousness
  • teach the habit of getting help to make sure that their spelling

 

PROBLEM:

Dyslexic readers are known to have a slower reading rate.

SOLUTION—dyslexia specific intervention:

  • be cognizant of at-risk dyslexic students’ slow reading rates when making in-class or heavy homework reading assignments
  • enable students with slow reading rates to use books on tape or recordings.
  • test-taking accommodations, such as extra time to take tests

 

Selective post concerning dyslexia from

Dr. Gentry's PyschologyToday.com blog:

 

“Are You Dyslexic? Is Your Child? Find out the classic early warning signs of dyslexia.”

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/raising-readers-writers-and-spellers/201603/are-you-dyslexic-is-your-child

 

 

“In Plain Language: 5 Big FAQ’s About Dyslexia Follow these tips to understand and help dyslexics.”

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/raising-readers-writers-and-spellers/201312/in-plain-language-5-big-faq-s-about-dyslexia

 

 

 

Contact

Richard

Gentry

Intended Audience:

Preschool—Adult: Administrators, Classroom Teachers, Special Ed Teachers, Staff Developers, Parents

Duration:

Session may be Keynote Address or Workshop Session. Session time is flexible

Short Abstract:

Dyslexia is now recognized as the nation’s number one learning disability. One in five children may have dyslexia causing them to struggle with reading and spelling. Every teacher likely has at least one or two dyslexic children in his or her classroom today. This 2018 up-to-date session helps participants understand, identify, and overcome reading and spelling problems associated with dyslexia.

 

Content:

  • Organization of the Reading Brain
  • Answers to Frequently Asked Questions
  • Common Misconceptions
  • How to better accommodate dyslexics in the regular classroom (dyslexia-specific interventions

 

Dr. Gentry is a dyslexia advocate who has overcome dyslexia himself. His work in this area includes parent and teacher workshops for the Toronto District School Board (the seventh largest district in North America) and keynoting the Dallas Branch of the International  Dyslexia Association Conference—one of the largest in the nation. Optional workshop resources include his book chapters on dyslexia and publications on dyslexia in Psychology Today:

 

“7 Ways to Accommodate Dyslexics in Regular Classrooms: Find out easy ways to help dyslexics in the regular classroom.”

 

PROBLEM:

Dyslexics are known to have difficulty with expressive language. For example, they may have trouble retrieving the right words to express themselves (even though the word is on the tip of their tongue) or difficulty organizing their thoughts in conversation.

 

SOLUTIONdyslexia specific intervention:

A teacher who understands the child’s situation will be patient and understanding and perhaps look for other ways of expression or alternatives for demonstrating competence.

 

PROBLEM:

Difficulty organizing, managing their time, and following a teacher’s directions. Additionally, some studies have shown that dyslexics can have difficulty filtering out background noise (Lapkin, 2016).

 

SOLUTION—dyslexia specific intervention:

Cutting back on classroom noise, reducing distractions, or seat placement closer to the teacher to help the student focus on instruction can be helpful (Sperling, Lu, Manis, & Seidenberg, 2005). Also, recognize that boys with dyslexia sometimes act out due to frustration.

 

PROBLEM:

Dyslexics often have difficulty with handwriting.

 

SOLUTIONdyslexia specific intervention:

Be an advocate for teaching handwriting in school.

 

With beginners:

  • handwriting experience facilitates letter learning
  • sets up the neural systems that underlie reading, writing, and spelling
  • it predicts later reading success
  • dyslexic-specific intervention that should be happening in all schools.

 

NOTE: Dyslexics tend to spell better in cursive. Even in upper elementary and middle school, research has shown that learning to write in cursive improved spelling and composing skills (Berninger, 2015).

 

PROBLEM:

Spelling is the telltale sign of dyslexia.

 

SOLUTIONdyslexia specific intervention:

Use a research-based spelling curriculum as a dyslexic-specific intervention.

 

  • a research-based, grade-by-grade spelling curriculum
  • explicit spelling instruction 15 minutes a day
  • monitor students’ progress. In kindergarten and Grade 1 monitoring children’s invented spelling (i.e., children’s self-directed attempts to spell words) in five developmental phases
  • recognizing signals of dyslexia in elementary students writing

 

PROBLEM: Dyslexics likely can’t “see” words in their mind when they spell.

 

SOLUTIONdyslexia specific intervention:

Expect to give dyslexics more help with proofreading.

  • avoid criticizing or counting off for spelling errors
  • offer extra support and teach them spelling consciousness
  • teach the habit of getting help to make sure that their spelling

 

PROBLEM:

Dyslexic readers are known to have a slower reading rate.

SOLUTION—dyslexia specific intervention:

  • be cognizant of at-risk dyslexic students’ slow reading rates when making in-class or heavy homework reading assignments
  • enable students with slow reading rates to use books on tape or recordings.
  • test-taking accommodations, such as extra time to take tests

 

Selective post concerning dyslexia from

Dr. Gentry's PyschologyToday.com blog:

 

“Are You Dyslexic? Is Your Child? Find out the classic early warning signs of dyslexia.”

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/raising-readers-writers-and-spellers/201603/are-you-dyslexic-is-your-child

 

 

“In Plain Language: 5 Big FAQ’s About Dyslexia Follow these tips to understand and help dyslexics.”

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/raising-readers-writers-and-spellers/201312/in-plain-language-5-big-faq-s-about-dyslexia

J. Richard Gentry

Author, Educator, Speaker

 

Content:

  • Organization of the Reading Brain
  • Answers to Frequently Asked Questions
  • Common Misconceptions
  • How to better accommodate dyslexics in the regular classroom (dyslexia-specific interventions)

 

Dr. Gentry is a dyslexia advocate who has overcome dyslexia himself. His work in this area includes parent and teacher workshops for the Toronto District School Board (the seventh largest district in North America) and keynoting the Dallas Branch of the International  Dyslexia Association Conference—one of the largest in the nation. Optional workshop resources include his book chapters on dyslexia and publications on dyslexia in Psychology Today:

 

“7 Ways to Accommodate Dyslexics in Regular Classrooms: Find out easy ways to help dyslexics in the regular classroom.”

 

PROBLEM:

Dyslexics are known to have difficulty with expressive language. For example, they may have trouble retrieving the right words to express themselves (even though the word is on the tip of their tongue) or difficulty organizing their thoughts in conversation.

 

SOLUTIONdyslexia specific intervention:

A teacher who understands the child’s situation will be patient and understanding and perhaps look for other ways of expression or alternatives for demonstrating competence.

 

PROBLEM:

Difficulty organizing, managing their time, and following a teacher’s directions. Additionally, some studies have shown that dyslexics can have difficulty filtering out background noise (Lapkin, 2016).

 

SOLUTION—dyslexia specific intervention:

Cutting back on classroom noise, reducing distractions, or seat placement closer to the teacher to help the student focus on instruction can be helpful (Sperling, Lu, Manis, & Seidenberg, 2005). Also, recognize that boys with dyslexia sometimes act out due to frustration.

 

PROBLEM:

Dyslexics often have difficulty with handwriting.

 

SOLUTIONdyslexia specific intervention:

Be an advocate for teaching handwriting in school.

 

With beginners:

  • handwriting experience facilitates letter learning
  • sets up the neural systems that underlie reading, writing, and spelling
  • it predicts later reading success
  • dyslexic-specific intervention that should be happening in all schools.

 

NOTE: Dyslexics tend to spell better in cursive. Even in upper elementary and middle school, research has shown that learning to write in cursive improved spelling and composing skills (Berninger, 2015).

 

PROBLEM:

Spelling is the telltale sign of dyslexia.

 

SOLUTIONdyslexia specific intervention:

Use a research-based spelling curriculum as a dyslexic-specific intervention.

 

  • a research-based, grade-by-grade spelling curriculum
  • explicit spelling instruction 15 minutes a day
  • monitor students’ progress. In kindergarten and Grade 1 monitoring children’s invented spelling (i.e., children’s self-directed attempts to spell words) in five developmental phases
  • recognizing signals of dyslexia in elementary students writing

 

PROBLEM: Dyslexics likely can’t “see” words in their mind when they spell.

 

SOLUTIONdyslexia specific intervention:

Expect to give dyslexics more help with proofreading.

  • avoid criticizing or counting off for spelling errors
  • offer extra support and teach them spelling consciousness
  • teach the habit of getting help to make sure that their spelling

 

PROBLEM:

Dyslexic readers are known to have a slower reading rate.

SOLUTION—dyslexia specific intervention:

  • be cognizant of at-risk dyslexic students’ slow reading rates when making in-class or heavy homework reading assignments
  • enable students with slow reading rates to use books on tape or recordings.
  • test-taking accommodations, such as extra time to take tests

 

Selective post concerning dyslexia from

Dr. Gentry's PyschologyToday.com blog:

 

“Are You Dyslexic? Is Your Child? Find out the classic early warning signs of dyslexia.”

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/raising-readers-writers-and-spellers/201603/are-you-dyslexic-is-your-child

 

 

“In Plain Language: 5 Big FAQ’s About Dyslexia Follow these tips to understand and help dyslexics.”

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/raising-readers-writers-and-spellers/201312/in-plain-language-5-big-faq-s-about-dyslexia